Good Stewardship

recycle cooking oilPreventing sewer problems is the best way to help keep wastewater costs/charges down in the future.  Please observe the following:

General Discharge Prohibitions – It is prohibited to contribute or cause to be contributed, whether directly or indirectly, any pollutant or wastewater which will interfere with the operation and/or performance of the Prohibited discharge is defined in Article 5 of Rincon Water’s Sewer Ordinance and includes, but is not limited to, swimming pool/spa drainage water; rainwater, stormwater, street, yard, and roof drainage; and, air cooler discharge.

Put Fats, Oils, and Grease Where They Belong and Avoid a Costly Spill – Cooking grease is one of the major causes of residential sewer main clogs. Cooking grease coats pipelines, clinging to the insides of the pipe, eventually causing blockages and potential sewer spills. Dispose of small amounts of cooking oil (this includes salad oil, frying oil and bacon fat) in the garbage, not in the drain. By following these simple tips, you will help avoid costly repair bills while helping to protect our sewers.

    • Never put grease or oil down your sink, drain, toilet, or garbage disposal
    • Place used grease and cooking oils in a safe container and store them in the refrigerator to solidify. Once solidified, discard the container in your household garbage.
    • Wipe excess grease from pots, pans, and utensils with a paper towel before washing dishes. Be sure to discard the paper towel into the trash.

Wipes Clog Pipes: Disposable Does Not Mean Flushable – Many household cleaning products labeled or marketed as “flushable” or “disposable” should not be flushed down the toilet. Why? Most wipes are made of woven fibers that do not easily break down or dissolve after being flushed. Their presence in the wastewater system can cause pipeline clogs or system failures. Items include:

    • Disinfecting wipes
    • “Disposable” hygiene wipes
    • Baby wipes
    • Mop refills
    • Paper towels
    • Towelettes

Since these products do not dissolve as quickly or easily as toilet paper, they may clog pipes and cause expensive and time-consuming repairs for homeowners. These products also clog public sewer pipes and pump station equipment leading to sewer backups. Be kind to your pipes and save yourself and your wastewater utility from potentially costly repairs. Put wipes in the trash, not the toilet!